Glacial effects limiting mountain height

@article{Egholm2009GlacialEL,
  title={Glacial effects limiting mountain height},
  author={David Lundbek Egholm and Susanne Balslev Nielsen and Vivi Kathrine Pedersen and Jerome Lesemann},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2009},
  volume={460},
  pages={884-887}
}
The height of mountain ranges reflects the balance between tectonic rock uplift, crustal strength and surface denudation. Tectonic deformation and surface denudation are interdependent, however, and feedback mechanisms—in particular, the potential link to climate—are subjects of intense debate. Spatial variations in fluvial denudation rate caused by precipitation gradients are known to provide first-order controls on mountain range width, crustal deformation rates and rock uplift. Moreover… 
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