Giraffe Thermoregulation: a review

@article{Mitchell2004GiraffeTA,
  title={Giraffe Thermoregulation: a review},
  author={Graham Mitchell and John D. Skinner},
  journal={Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa},
  year={2004},
  volume={59},
  pages={109 - 118}
}
  • G. Mitchell, J. Skinner
  • Published 1 January 2004
  • Environmental Science
  • Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa
The ability to maintain a relatively constant body temperature is central to the survival of mammals. Giraffes are found in relatively hot rather than cold environments, have a body temperature of 38.5 ± 0.5°C, and must have evolved appropriate thermoregulatory mechanisms to maintain this temperature and to survive in their chosen habitats. Their thermoregulation depends on anatomical features and behavioural and physiological mechanisms. To minimize physiological thermoregulation giraffes… 
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