Ginger as an antiemetic modality for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

@article{Lee2013GingerAA,
  title={Ginger as an antiemetic modality for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a systematic review and meta-analysis.},
  author={Jiyeon Lee and Heeyoung Oh},
  journal={Oncology nursing forum},
  year={2013},
  volume={40 2},
  pages={
          163-70
        }
}
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES To evaluate the effect of ginger as an antiemetic modality for the control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). DATA SOURCES Databases searched included MEDLINE® (PubMed), Embase, CINAHL®, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Korean Studies Information Service System, Research Information Sharing Service by the Korean Education and Research Information Service, and Dissertation Central. DATA SYNTHESIS A systematic review was conducted of five… 
A Quasi-Experimental Study of the Effect of Ginger Tea on Preventing Nausea and Vomiting in Patients With Gynecological Cancers Receiving Cisplatin-Based Regimens
TLDR
Ginger tea reduced the experience, development, and distress of nausea, vomiting, and retching in the intervention group, and the use of ginger tea may be recommended for chemotherapy-associated nausea and vomiting in cancer patients receiving cisplatin-based regimens.
Efficacy of Ginger in Ameliorating Acute and Delayed Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting Among Patients With Lung Cancer Receiving Cisplatin-Based Regimens: A Randomized Controlled Trial
TLDR
As an adjuvant drug to standard antiemetic therapy, ginger had no additional efficacy in ameliorating CINV in patients with lung cancer receiving cisplatin-based regimens.
The effect of ginger (Zingiber officinale) on chemotherapy‐induced nausea and vomiting in breast cancer patients: A systematic literature review of randomized controlled trials
TLDR
The investigation suggests that ginger may reduce nausea in the acute phase of chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer, and the effect of ginger on nausea and vomiting in other conditions requires more high‐quality clinical trials.
Ginger Relief Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Vomiting (CINV) in Children: A Randomized Clinical Trial
TLDR
According to the findings, ginger acts as an efficient antiemetic for pediatric patients and is recommended to be prescribed as well as other antiemetics like Granisetron, with no loss of function.
Benefits of ginger in the control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.
TLDR
This complementary therapy has low cost and easy access, but no statistical confirmation of its effectiveness in the management of nausea and vomiting in cancer patients was found.
Integrative Therapeutic Approaches for the Management and Control of Nausea in Children Undergoing Cancer Treatment: A Systematic Review of Literature
  • Thaer Momani, D. Berry
  • Medicine, Psychology
    Journal of pediatric oncology nursing : official journal of the Association of Pediatric Oncology Nurses
  • 2017
TLDR
The authors' review identified little information on the effectiveness and safety of most integrative therapeutic approaches for the control and management of CINV in children with cancer, however, evidence from adult cancer studies and some pediatric studies identify promising interventions for further testing.
Is ginger beneficial for nausea and vomiting? An update of the literature
TLDR
The results of studies suggest that ginger is a promising treatment for nausea and vomiting in a variety of clinical settings and possesses a clinically relevant mechanism; however, further studies are required to address the limitations in the current clinical literature before firm recommendations for its use can be made.
Does the Oral Administration of Ginger Reduce Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting?: A Meta-analysis of 10 Randomized Controlled Trials.
TLDR
Ginger displayed significant efficacy with regard to controlling CINV in the experimental groups and could provide a reference for antiemetic methods to treat CINv and facilitate support for more clinical trials in the future to establish relevant guidelines.
Antiemetics for adults for prevention of nausea and vomiting caused by moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy: a network meta-analysis.
TLDR
Evidence from NMA suggests that the following drug combinations are more efficacious than aprepitant + granisetron for completely controlling vomiting during the overall treatment phase, quality of life, serious adverse events (SAEs), and on-study mortality.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 22 REFERENCES
Phase II trial of encapsulated ginger as a treatment for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting
TLDR
Ginger provides no additional benefit for reduction of the prevalence or severity of acute or delayed CINV when given with 5-HT3 receptor antagonists and/or aprepitant.
Ginger for chemotherapy-related nausea in cancer patients: A URCC CCOP randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of 644 cancer patients.
  • J. Ryan, C. Heckler, G. Morrow
  • Medicine, Psychology
    Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • 2009
TLDR
Ginger supplementation at daily dose of 0.5g-1.0g significantly aids in reduction of nausea during the first day of chemotherapy, and time of day had a significant effect on nausea.
Antiemetic effect of ginger in gynecologic oncology patients receiving cisplatin
TLDR
Adding ginger to standard antiemetic regimen has no advantage in reducing nausea or vomiting in acute phase of cisplatin-induced emesis, and in delayed phase, ginger and metoclopramide have no statistically significant difference in efficacy.
Palonosetron improves prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting following moderately emetogenic chemotherapy: results of a double-blind randomized phase III trial comparing single doses of palonosetron with ondansetron.
TLDR
A single i.v. dose of palonosetron 0.25 mg was significantly superior to ondansetron 32 mg in the prevention of acute and delayed CINV and both treatments were well tolerated.
Ginger as an antiemetic in nausea and vomiting induced by chemotherapy: A randomized, cross-over, double blind study
TLDR
Powdered ginger root in the dose used was found to be effective in reducing nausea and vomiting induced by low dose cyclophosphamide in combination with drugs causing mild emesis.
Ginger (Zingiber officinale) reduces acute chemotherapy-induced nausea: a URCC CCOP study of 576 patients
TLDR
Ginger supplementation at a daily dose of 0.5 g–1.0 g significantly aids in reduction of the severity of acute chemotherapy-induced nausea in adult cancer patients.
Palonosetron in combination with 1-day versus 3-day dexamethasone for prevention of nausea and vomiting following moderately emetogenic chemotherapy: a randomized, multicenter, phase III trial
TLDR
Palonosetron plus single-dose dexamethasone administered before common MEC regimens provide protection against acute and delayed CINV which is non-inferior to that of palonosettron plus dexamETHasone for 3 days, however, the major benefit of the single-day regimen occurs in patients receiving non-AC M EC regimens.
Double-blind, randomised, controlled study of the efficacy and tolerability of palonosetron plus dexamethasone for 1 day with or without dexamethasone on days 2 and 3 in the prevention of nausea and vomiting induced by moderately emetogenic chemotherapy.
  • M. Aapro, A. Fabi, F. Roila
  • Medicine
    Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • 2010
TLDR
In patients treated with a single injection of palonosetron on day 1, reducing dexamethasone is an option that is not associated with significant reduction in antiemetic control during the 5-day period or an impact on patient functioning.
...
...