Ginger (Zingiber officinale) and chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a systematic literature review.

@article{Marx2013GingerO,
  title={Ginger (Zingiber officinale) and chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a systematic literature review.},
  author={Wolfgang Marx and Laisa Teleni and Alexandra L. McCarthy and L. Vitetta and Daniel Mckavanagh and Damien B. Thomson and Elizabeth Isenring},
  journal={Nutrition reviews},
  year={2013},
  volume={71 4},
  pages={
          245-54
        }
}
Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is a common side-effect of cytotoxic treatment. It continues to affect a significant proportion of patients despite the widespread use of antiemetic medication. In traditional medicine, ginger (Zingiber officinale) has been used to prevent and treat nausea in many cultures for thousands of years. However, its use has not been confirmed in the chemotherapy context. To determine the potential use of ginger as a prophylactic or treatment for CINV, a… 

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