Giant Late Triassic ichthyosaurs from the Kössen Formation of the Swiss Alps and their paleobiological implications

@article{MartinSander2021GiantLT,
  title={Giant Late Triassic ichthyosaurs from the K{\"o}ssen Formation of the Swiss Alps and their paleobiological implications},
  author={P. Martin Sander and Pablo P{\'e}rez de Villar and Heinz Furrer and Tanja Wintrich},
  journal={Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology},
  year={2021},
  volume={41}
}
ABSTRACT The Late Triassic was populated by the largest ichthyosaurs known to date, reaching lengths of over 20 m. Recent discoveries include the remains of giant ichthyosaurs from the Austroalpine nappes of the eastern Swiss Alps. The finds come from the lower two members of the Kössen Formation (late Norian to Rhaetian). The material consists of a very large tooth lacking most of the crown from the Rhaetian Schesaplana Member, a postcranial bone association of one very large vertebra and ten… 
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