Getting a grip on things: how do communities of bacterial symbionts become established in our intestine?

@article{Sonnenburg2004GettingAG,
  title={Getting a grip on things: how do communities of bacterial symbionts become established in our intestine?},
  author={J. Sonnenburg and L. T. Angenent and J. I. Gordon},
  journal={Nature Immunology},
  year={2004},
  volume={5},
  pages={569-573}
}
  • J. Sonnenburg, L. T. Angenent, J. I. Gordon
  • Published 2004
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Nature Immunology
  • The gut contains our largest collection of resident microorganisms. One obvious question is how microbial communities establish and maintain themselves within a perfused intestine. The answers, which may come in part from observations made by environmental engineers and glycobiologists, have important implications for immunologists who wish to understand how indigenous microbial communities are accommodated. Here we propose that the mucus gel layer overlying the intestinal epithelium is a key… CONTINUE READING
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