Getting Beyond the Point: Textiles of the Terminal Pleistocene/Early Holocene in the Northwestern Great Basin

@article{Connolly2016GettingBT,
  title={Getting Beyond the Point: Textiles of the Terminal Pleistocene/Early Holocene in the Northwestern Great Basin},
  author={Thomas J. Connolly and Pat Barker and Catherine S. Fowler and Eugene M. Hattori and Dennis L. Jenkins and William J. Cannon},
  journal={American Antiquity},
  year={2016},
  volume={81},
  pages={490 - 514}
}
Although the Great Basin of North America has produced some of the most robust and ancient fiber artifact assemblages in the world, many were recovered with poor chronological controls. Consequently, this class of artifacts has seldom been effectively incorporated into general discussions of early chronological and cultural patterns. In recent years, the Great Basin Textile Dating Project has accumulated direct AMS dates on textiles (bags, sandals, mats, cordage, and basketry) from dry caves in… 
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Effect of the upward curvature of toe springs on walking biomechanics in humans
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