Gestational drive and the green-bearded placenta.

@article{Haig1996GestationalDA,
  title={Gestational drive and the green-bearded placenta.},
  author={David Haig},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={1996},
  volume={93 13},
  pages={
          6547-51
        }
}
  • D. Haig
  • Published 25 June 1996
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
A "green beard" refers to a gene, or group of genes, that is able to recognize itself in other individuals and direct benefits to these individuals. Green-beard effects have been dismissed as implausible by authors who have implicitly assumed sophisticated mechanisms of perception and complex behavioral responses. However, many simple mechanisms for genes to "recognize" themselves exist at the maternal-fetal interface of viviparous organisms. Homophilic cell adhesion molecules, for example, are… Expand

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Haig Proc
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