Germline mutations in the ribonuclease L gene in families showing linkage with HPC1

@article{Carpten2002GermlineMI,
  title={Germline mutations in the ribonuclease L gene in families showing linkage with HPC1},
  author={John D. Carpten and Nina N. Nupponen and Sarah D. Isaacs and Raman Sood and Christiane M. Robbins and J. Xu and Mezbah U. Faruque and Tracy Y. Moses and Charles M. Ewing and Elizabeth Gillanders and Ping Hu and Piroska Bujnovszky and Izabela Makałowska and Agnes B. Baffoe-Bonnie and Dennis A. Faith and James Smith and Dietrich A. Stephan and Kathleen E. Wiley and Michael J. Brownstein and Derek Gildea and Brian Kelly and R B Jenkins and Galen Hostetter and Mika P. Matikainen and Johanna Schleutker and Katherine Wood Klinger and Timothy D. Connors and Yong-Bing Xiang and Zaixing Wang and Angelo De Marzo and Nikitas Papadopoulos and Olli Kallioniemi and Robert D. Burk and D. A. Meyers and Henrik Gr{\"o}nberg and P. Meltzer and Rachel C. Silverman and Joan E. Bailey-Wilson and Patrick C. Walsh and William B. Isaacs and Jeffrey M. Trent},
  journal={Nature Genetics},
  year={2002},
  volume={30},
  pages={181-184}
}
Although prostate cancer is the most common non-cutaneous malignancy diagnosed in men in the United States, little is known about inherited factors that influence its genetic predisposition. Here we report that germline mutations in the gene encoding 2′-5′-oligoadenylate(2-5A)–dependent RNase L (RNASEL) segregate in prostate cancer families that show linkage to the HPC1 (hereditary prostate cancer 1) region at 1q24–25 (ref. 9). We identified RNASEL by a positional cloning/candidate gene method… Expand
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