German Inflection: The Exception That Proves the Rule

@article{Marcus1995GermanIT,
  title={German Inflection: The Exception That Proves the Rule},
  author={G. Marcus and U. Brinkmann and H. Clahsen and R. Wiese and S. Pinker},
  journal={Cognitive Psychology},
  year={1995},
  volume={29},
  pages={189-256}
}
Language is often explained as the product of generative rules and a memorized lexicon. For example, most English verbs take a regular past tense suffix (ask-asked), which is applied to new verbs (faxed, wugged), suggesting the mental rule "add -ed to a Verb." Irregular verbs (break-broke, go-went) would be listed in memory. Alternatively, a pattern associator memory (such as a connectionist network) might record all past tense forms and generalize to new ones by similarity; irregular and… Expand
Sensitivity of children's inflection to grammatical structure.
Words and rules
The role of meaning in inflection: Why the past tense does not require a rule
Lexical semantics and irregular inflection
The role of meaning in past-tense inflection: Evidence from polysemy and denominal derivation
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