Geospatial analysis requires a different way of thinking: the problem of spatial heterogeneity

@article{Jiang2015GeospatialAR,
  title={Geospatial analysis requires a different way of thinking: the problem of spatial heterogeneity},
  author={Bin Jiang},
  journal={GeoJournal},
  year={2015},
  volume={80},
  pages={1-13}
}
  • B. Jiang
  • Published 23 January 2014
  • Economics
  • GeoJournal
Geospatial analysis is very much dominated by a Gaussian way of thinking, which assumes that things in the world can be characterized by a well-defined mean, i.e., things are more or less similar in size. However, this assumption is not always valid. In fact, many things in the world lack a well-defined mean, and therefore there are far more small things than large ones. This paper attempts to argue that geospatial analysis requires a different way of thinking—a Paretian way of thinking that… 

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