Geophagy by the Indian short-nosed fruit bat, Cynopterus sphinx (Pteropodidae) while foraging on Madhuca latifolia (Sapotaceae) in Tamil Nadu, South India

@article{Mahandran2015GeophagyBT,
  title={Geophagy by the Indian short-nosed fruit bat, Cynopterus sphinx (Pteropodidae) while foraging on Madhuca latifolia (Sapotaceae) in Tamil Nadu, South India},
  author={Valliyappan Mahandran and Hanumanthan Raghuram and Parthasarathy Thiruchenthil Nathan},
  journal={acta ethologica},
  year={2015},
  volume={19},
  pages={95-99}
}
Geophagy has been reported in many mammals and birds. However, in pteropodid bats, this behaviour has not been reported. Here, we document geophagy behaviour by the pteropodid bat, Cynopterus sphinx, during foraging in the fruiting trees of Madhuca latifolia (Sapotaceae). These bats removed single fruits from the foraging tree and carried it to the feeding roost for consumption. At around 1900 h, we observed three individuals of C. sphinx gleaning over the ground surface by circling flights… 

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