Geophagy among primates: adaptive significance and ecological consequences

@article{Krishnamani2000GeophagyAP,
  title={Geophagy among primates: adaptive significance and ecological consequences},
  author={Ramanathan Krishnamani and William C. Mahaney},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2000},
  volume={59},
  pages={899-915}
}
We review geophagy, or soil ingestion, in primates. This behaviour is widespread and is presumed to be important to health and nutrition. Primates may engage in geophagy for one or a combination of reasons. Here we present, and make a preliminary assessment of, six nonexclusive hypotheses that may contribute to the prevalence of geophagy. Four hypotheses relate to geophagy in alleviating gastrointestinal disorders or upsets: (1) soils adsorb toxins such as phenolics and secondary metabolites… Expand
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TLDR
The results provide a new evidence to view geophagy as a practice for maintaining health, explaining its persistence through evolution and support the hypothesis that soil enhances the pharmacological properties of the bio-available gastric fraction. Expand
Why On Earth?: Evaluating Hypotheses About The Physiological Functions Of Human Geophagy
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The results indicate that human geophagy is best explained as providing protection from dietary chemicals, parasites, and pathogens, whereas animal geophagic may involve both micronutrient acquisition and protection. Expand
Geophagic behavior in the mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus): support for meeting metabolic demands
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Data from an undisturbed population of mountain goats inhabiting a geologically distinct coastal mountain range in southwestern British Columbia provide support for the hypothesis that geophagy behavior is a proximate mechanism for nutrient supplementation to meet metabolic demands. Expand
Geophagy among nonhuman primates: A systematic review of current knowledge and suggestions for future directions.
TLDR
The limited evidence suggests that geophagy is adaptive, and provides protection and mineral supplementation, and that it is protective, provides mineral supplements, and is nonadaptive. Expand
Bornean orangutan geophagy: analysis of ingested and control soils
TLDR
Observations of soil consumption by orangutans in the Sungai Wain Forest Preserve of Borneo are presented, along with physico-mineral–chemical analyses of the ingested soil in an effort to understand what might stimulate the activity. Expand
Geophagy and potential contaminant exposure for terrestrial vertebrates.
  • C. A. Hui
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • Reviews of environmental contamination and toxicology
  • 2004
TLDR
Contaminant exposure by geophagy is affected by filtration of soil fractions, binding of some elements into compounds not absorbable through the gut wall, and neutralizing of toxicity after absorption. Expand
Assessing the function of geophagy in a Malagasy rain forest lemur
TLDR
Soil consumption significantly correlated with fruit/seed consumption overall, but to a lesser degree in logged compared with unlogged sites, provides strong evidence for the protection hypothesis for geophagy, which may be especially important in areas where logging, or other forms of habitat disturbance, has been experienced. Expand
Geophagy in the yellow-tailed woolly monkey (Lagothrix flavicauda) at La Esperanza, Peru: site characterization and soil composition
TLDR
High clay content lends support to geophagy as a mechanism for protection of the gastrointestinal tract in L. flavicauda, who face an increased predation risk when descending to the ground in the dry season. Expand
Avian Geophagy and Soil Characteristics in Southeastern Peru
ABSTRACT We observed ten species of psittacids, three species of columbids, and two species of cracids consuming soil from banks of the lower Tambopata River in southeastern Peru. Our study usedExpand
The function of geophagy in Nepal gray langurs: Sodium acquisition rather than detoxification or prevention of acidosis.
TLDR
The most likely function of geophagy was the acquisition of sodium in Nepal gray langurs, consistent with reports for other animals. Expand
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