Corpus ID: 192914733

Geometry and topography in James Joyce's Ulysses and Finnegans Wake

@inproceedings{McMorran2016GeometryAT,
  title={Geometry and topography in James Joyce's Ulysses and Finnegans Wake},
  author={C. McMorran},
  year={2016}
}
Following the development of non-Euclidean geometries from the mid-nineteenth century onwards, Euclid’s system had come to be re-conceived as a language for describing reality rather than a set of transcendental laws. As Henri Poincare famously put it, ‘[i]f several geometries are possible, is it certain that our geometry [...] is true?’. By examining Joyce’s linguistic play and conceptual engagement with ground-breaking geometric constructs in Ulysses and Finnegans Wake, this thesis explores… Expand

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