Geometric morphometric analysis of a new Miocene bumble bee from the Randeck Maar of southwestern Germany (Hymenoptera: Apidae)

@article{Wappler2012GeometricMA,
  title={Geometric morphometric analysis of a new Miocene bumble bee from the Randeck Maar of southwestern Germany (Hymenoptera: Apidae)},
  author={Torsten Wappler and Thibaut De Meulemeester and A. MURAT AYTEKIN and Denis Michez and Michael S. Engel},
  journal={Systematic Entomology},
  year={2012},
  volume={37}
}
The first fossil bumble bee (Apinae: Bombini) from the Miocene Randeck Maar of southwestern Germany is described and illustrated. The specimen is subjected to a geometric morphometric analysis along with a diversity of other bumble bee species representing most major extant lineages, and particularly the subgenus Bombus s.s. The morphometric analysis supports the placement of the Randeck Maar species within Bombus s.s., as a species distinct from all others in the subgenus. It shows that extant… Expand
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