Geological and anthropogenic controls on the sampling of the terrestrial fossil record: a case study from the Dinosauria

@inproceedings{Upchurch2011GeologicalAA,
  title={Geological and anthropogenic controls on the sampling of the terrestrial fossil record: a case study from the Dinosauria},
  author={Paul Upchurch and Philip D. Mannion and Roger B. J. Benson and Richard J. Butler and Matthew T. Carrano},
  year={2011}
}
Abstract Dinosaurs provide excellent opportunities to examine the impact of sampling biases on the palaeodiversity of terrestrial organisms. The stratigraphical and geographical ranges of 847 dinosaurian species are analysed for palaeodiversity patterns and compared to several sampling metrics. The observed diversity of dinosaurs, Theropoda, Sauropodomorpha and Ornithischia, are positively correlated with sampling at global and regional scales. Sampling metrics for the same region correlate… 
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