Geological Setting and Age of Australopithecus sediba from Southern Africa

@article{Dirks2010GeologicalSA,
  title={Geological Setting and Age of Australopithecus sediba from Southern Africa},
  author={Paul Hgm Dirks and Job Munuhe Kibii and Brian F. Kuhn and Christine M. Steininger and Steven Emilio Churchill and Jan D. Kramers and Robyn Pickering and Daniel L. Farber and Anne‐Sophie M{\'e}riaux and Andy I. R. Herries and Geoffrey C. P. King and Lee R. Berger},
  journal={Science},
  year={2010},
  volume={328},
  pages={205 - 208}
}
From Australopithecus to Homo Our genus Homo is thought to have evolved a little more than 2 million years ago from the earlier hominid Australopithecus. But there are few fossils that provide detailed information on this transition. Berger et al. (p. 195; see the cover) now describe two partial skeletons, including most of the skull, pelvis, and ankle, of a new species of Australopithecus that are informative. The skeletons were found in a cave in South Africa encased in sediments dated by… 
Australopithecus sediba: A New Species of Homo-Like Australopith from South Africa
TLDR
Combined craniodental and postcranial evidence demonstrates that this new species of Australopithecus shares more derived features with early Homo than any other australopith species and thus might help reveal the ancestor of that genus.
Contemporaneity of Australopithecus, Paranthropus, and early Homo erectus in South Africa
TLDR
The age confirms that species of Australopithecus, Paranthropus, and early Homo overlapped in the karst of South Africa ∼2 million years ago and establishes these fossils as the oldest definitive specimens of their respective species ever discovered.
Australopithecus sediba from Malapa, South Africa
First discovered in August of 2008, the site of Malapa, South Africa revealed two relatively complete partial skeletons that we assigned to a new species, Australopithecus sediba. Additional
Chapter 9 Australopithecus sediba from Malapa , South Africa
First discovered in August of 2008, the site of Malapa, South Africa revealed two relatively complete partial skeletons that we assigned to a new species, Australopithecus sediba. Additional
The Paleobiology of Australopithecus 123 Contributions from the Fourth Stony Brook
Hominin paleoecology is reconstructed using many types of evidence from fossils and their geological context. This evidence is limited by vagaries of the fossil and geological record. What questions
The diet of Australopithecus sediba
TLDR
Results from the first extraction of plant phytoliths from dental calculus of an early hominin are presented, including stable carbon isotope and dental microwear texture data for Au.
Reconstructing the Habitats of Australopithecus: Paleoenvironments, Site Taphonomy, and Faunas
Hominin paleoecology is reconstructed using many types of evidence from fossils and their geological context. This evidence is limited by vagaries of the fossil and geological record. What questions
The first hominin from the early Pleistocene paleocave of Haasgat, South Africa
TLDR
The first hominin identified from Haasgat is reported, a partial maxillary molar that was recovered from an ex situ calcified sediment block sampled from the locality, and it is suggested that this specimen best fits within the Australopithecus—early Homo hypodigms to the exclusion of the genus Paranthropus.
Carnivoran Remains from the Malapa Hominin Site, South Africa
TLDR
The fauna represented at Malapa has the potential to elucidate aspects of the evolution of Dinofelis and may help resolve competing hypotheses about faunal exchange between East and Southern Africa during the late Pliocene or early Pleistocene.
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References

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Australopithecus sediba: A New Species of Homo-Like Australopith from South Africa
TLDR
Combined craniodental and postcranial evidence demonstrates that this new species of Australopithecus shares more derived features with early Homo than any other australopith species and thus might help reveal the ancestor of that genus.
Revised age estimates of Australopithecus-bearing deposits at Sterkfontein, South Africa.
TLDR
The interpretation of the fauna, the archeometric results, and the magnetostratigraphy of Sterkfontein indicate that it is unlikely that any Members yet described from SterkFontein are in excess of 3.04 Ma in age, and it is suggested that Australopithecus africanus should not be considered as a temporal contemporary of Australopheticcus afarensis, Australopheses bahrelghazali, and Kenyanthropus platyops.
A fossil skull probably of the genus Homo from Sterkfontein, Transvaal
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The new find supports the view that the Sterkfontein toolmaker was not the earlier A. africanus, but a later hominid related to Homo habilis, and is establishing indisputably the provenance of the specimen.
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Although 74 years have elapsed since the discovery at Taung of the first Australopithecus fossil, and despite intensive fieldwork in East Africa and 32 years of non-stop excavation at Sterkfontein,
A New Type of Fossil Man
TLDR
In the main bone breccia of the cave deposit there has been a pocket excavated and refilled by a darker type of matrix that must be considerably younger than the main deposit, which is Upper Pliocene, not improbably the pocket may be Lower Pleistocene.
The Hunters or the Hunted?: An Introduction to African Cave Taphonomy
  • C. K. Brain
  • Geography, Environmental Science
    Geological Magazine
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"Amongst scientists involved [in taphonomy], C. K. Brain stands out as the pioneer; this impressive book is a statement of his investigations. . . . The Hunters or the Hunted? is a very important
Tectonic and geochronological constraints on late Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic stratigraphic correlation within and between the Kaapvaal and Pilbara Cratons
Recent radiometric dating of carbonates and banded iron-formations on the Kaapvaal Craton, southern Africa, has suggested that late Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic carbonate sedimentation was
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