Geographical variation in host use of a blood-feeding ectoparasitic fly: implications for population invasiveness

@article{Vlimki2011GeographicalVI,
  title={Geographical variation in host use of a blood-feeding ectoparasitic fly: implications for population invasiveness},
  author={Panu V{\"a}lim{\"a}ki and Arja Kaitala and Knut Madslien and Laura H{\"a}rk{\"o}nen and Gergely V{\'a}rkonyi and J. Heikkil{\"a} and Mervi Jaakola and Hannu Yl{\"o}nen and Raine Kortet and Bj{\o}rnar Ytrehus},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2011},
  volume={166},
  pages={985-995}
}
Invasive generalist ectoparasites provide a tool to study factors affecting expansion rates. An increase in the number of host species may facilitate geographic range expansion by increasing the number of suitable habitats and by affecting local extinction and colonization rates. A geographic perspective on parasite host specificity and its implications on range expansion are, however, insufficiently understood. We conducted a field study to explore if divergent host specificity could explain… Expand
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