Geographic parthenogenesis and the common tea‐tree stick insect of New Zealand

@article{MorganRichards2010GeographicPA,
  title={Geographic parthenogenesis and the common tea‐tree stick insect of New Zealand},
  author={Mary Morgan‐Richards and Steven A. Trewick and Ian A. N. Stringer},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2010},
  volume={19}
}
Worldwide, parthenogenetic reproduction has evolved many times in the stick insects (Phasmatidae). Many parthenogenetic stick insects show the distribution pattern known as geographic parthenogenesis, in that they occupy habitats that are at higher altitude or latitude compared with their sexual relatives. Although it is often assumed that, in the short term, parthenogenetic populations will have a reproductive advantage over sexual populations; this is not necessarily the case. We present data… Expand
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