Geographic Affinity, Cuticular Hydrocarbons and Colony Recognition in the Australian Meat Ant Iridomyrmex purpureus

@article{Thomas1999GeographicAC,
  title={Geographic Affinity, Cuticular Hydrocarbons and Colony Recognition in the Australian Meat Ant Iridomyrmex purpureus},
  author={Melissa L. Thomas and Laura J Parry and Rachel A. Allan and Mark A Elgar},
  journal={Naturwissenschaften},
  year={1999},
  volume={86},
  pages={87-92}
}
Correspondence to: M.L. Thomas The defence of nests from intruders is critical for maintaining the integrity and survival of social insect colonies. Using a sampling method that attempts to minimise genetic influences, we examined whether geographic affinity (the distance between nests) affects non-nestmate recognition. Experimentally staged conflicts between ’chilled’ workers of Iridomyrmex purpureus from different nests revealed that individuals reacted more aggressively towards intruders… CONTINUE READING
BETA

From This Paper

Figures and tables from this paper.

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
SHOWING 1-10 OF 60 CITATIONS, ESTIMATED 38% COVERAGE

FILTER CITATIONS BY YEAR

2000
2018

CITATION STATISTICS

  • 5 Highly Influenced Citations

  • Averaged 2 Citations per year over the last 3 years

  • 50% Increase in citations per year in 2018 over 2017

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
SHOWING 1-10 OF 31 REFERENCES

lygyny via unrelated queens indicated by mitochondrial DNA variation in the Australian Meat ant Iridomyrmex purpureus

  • RH Crozier, P Pamilo, YC Crozier
  • Insectes Sociaux
  • 1997

Apparent dearenemy phenomenon and environmentbased recognition cues in the ant Leptothorax nylanderi

  • B Hölldobler
  • Ethology
  • 1996

Similar Papers

Loading similar papers…