Geographic Affinity, Cuticular Hydrocarbons and Colony Recognition in the Australian Meat Ant Iridomyrmex purpureus

@article{Thomas1999GeographicAC,
  title={Geographic Affinity, Cuticular Hydrocarbons and Colony Recognition in the Australian Meat Ant Iridomyrmex purpureus},
  author={Melissa L. Thomas and Laura J. Parry and Rachel A. Allan and Mark A. Elgar},
  journal={Naturwissenschaften},
  year={1999},
  volume={86},
  pages={87-92}
}
Correspondence to: M.L. Thomas The defence of nests from intruders is critical for maintaining the integrity and survival of social insect colonies. Using a sampling method that attempts to minimise genetic influences, we examined whether geographic affinity (the distance between nests) affects non-nestmate recognition. Experimentally staged conflicts between ’chilled’ workers of Iridomyrmex purpureus from different nests revealed that individuals reacted more aggressively towards intruders… Expand

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