Genuine and drug-induced synesthesia: A comparison

@article{Sinke2012GenuineAD,
  title={Genuine and drug-induced synesthesia: A comparison},
  author={Christopher Sinke and John H. Halpern and Markus Zedler and Janina Neufeld and Hinderk M. Emrich and Torsten Passie},
  journal={Consciousness and Cognition},
  year={2012},
  volume={21},
  pages={1419-1434}
}
Despite some principal similarities, there is no systematic comparison between the different types of synesthesia (genuine, acquired and drug-induced). This comprehensive review compares the three principal types of synesthesia and focuses on their phenomenological features and their relation to different etiological models. Implications of this comparison for the validity of the different etiological models are discussed. Comparison of the three forms of synesthesia show many more differences… Expand

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