Genre Theory, Health-Care Discourse, and Professional Identity Formation

@article{Schryer2005GenreTH,
  title={Genre Theory, Health-Care Discourse, and Professional Identity Formation},
  author={C. Schryer and Philippa M. Spoel},
  journal={Journal of Business and Technical Communication},
  year={2005},
  volume={19},
  pages={249 - 278}
}
  • C. Schryer, Philippa M. Spoel
  • Published 2005
  • Sociology
  • Journal of Business and Technical Communication
  • This article explores the value of rhetorical genre theory for health care and professional communication researchers. The authors outline the conceptual resources emerging from genre theory, specifically ways to conceptualize social context, professional identity formation, and genres as functioning but hierarchical networks, and discuss the way they have used these resources in two separate but complementary health-care studies: a project that documents the ways regulated and regularized… CONTINUE READING
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