Genotyping Yersinia pestis in Historical Plague: Evidence for Long-Term Persistence of Y. pestis in Europe from the 14th to the 17th Century

@inproceedings{Seifert2016GenotypingYP,
  title={Genotyping Yersinia pestis in Historical Plague: Evidence for Long-Term Persistence of Y. pestis in Europe from the 14th to the 17th Century},
  author={Lisa Seifert and Ingrid Wiechmann and Michaela Harbeck and Astrid Thomas and Gisela Grupe and Michaela Projahn and Holger Christian Scholz and Julia M Riehm and Xue-Jie Yu},
  booktitle={PloS one},
  year={2016}
}
Ancient DNA (aDNA) recovered from plague victims of the second plague pandemic (14th to 17th century), excavated from two different burial sites in Germany, and spanning a time period of more than 300 years, was characterized using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. Of 30 tested skeletons 8 were positive for Yersinia pestis-specific nucleic acid, as determined by qPCR targeting the pla gene. In one individual (MP-19-II), the pla copy number in DNA extracted from tooth pulp was as… CONTINUE READING

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