Genotype–phenotype correlation in hepatocellular adenoma: New classification and relationship with HCC

@article{ZucmanRossi2006GenotypephenotypeCI,
  title={Genotype–phenotype correlation in hepatocellular adenoma: New classification and relationship with HCC},
  author={Jessica Zucman‐Rossi and Emmanuelle Jeannot and Jeanne Tran van Nhieu and Jean-Yves Scoazec and Catherine Guettier and Sandra Rebouissou and Yannick Bacq and Emmanuelle Leteurtre and Val{\'e}rie Paradis and Sophie Michalak and Dominique Wendum and Laurence Chiche and Monique Fabr{\`e} and Lucille Mellott{\'e}e and Christophe Laurent and Christian C-M Partensky and Denis Castaing and Elie Serge Zafrani and Pierre Laurent-Puig and Charles Balabaud and Paulette Bioulac-Sage},
  journal={Hepatology},
  year={2006},
  volume={43}
}
Hepatocellular adenomas are benign tumors that can be difficult to diagnose. To refine their classification, we performed a comprehensive analysis of their genetic, pathological, and clinical features. A multicentric series of 96 liver tumors with a firm or possible diagnosis of hepatocellular adenoma was reviewed by liver pathologists. In all cases, the genes coding for hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α) and β‐catenin were sequenced. No tumors were mutated in both HNF1α and β‐catenin… Expand
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