Genotoxicity of bioremediated soils from the Reilly Tar site, St. Louis Park, Minnesota.

@article{Hughes1998GenotoxicityOB,
  title={Genotoxicity of bioremediated soils from the Reilly Tar site, St. Louis Park, Minnesota.},
  author={T J Hughes and Larry D. Claxton and Lance R. Brooks and Sarah H. Warren and Robert Brenner and Frederico Schmitt Kremer},
  journal={Environmental Health Perspectives},
  year={1998},
  volume={106},
  pages={1427 - 1433}
}
An in vitro approach was used to measure the genotoxicity of creosote-contaminated soil before and after four bioremediation processes. The soil was taken from the Reilly Tar site, a closed Superfund site in Saint Louis Park, Minnesota. The creosote soil was bioremediated in bioslurry, biopile, compost, and land treatment, which were optimized for effective treatment. Mutagenicity profiles of dichloromethane extracts of the five soils were determined in the Spiral technique of the Salmonella… 

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