Genomic regions under selection in the feralization of the dingoes

@article{Zhang2020GenomicRU,
  title={Genomic regions under selection in the feralization of the dingoes},
  author={Shao-jie Zhang and Guo-Dong Wang and Pengcheng Ma and Liang-liang Zhang and Ting-ting Yin and Yan-Hu Liu and Newton Otieno Otecko and Meng Wang and Ya-ping Ma and Lu Wang and Bingyu Mao and Peter Savolainen and Ya-ping Zhang},
  journal={Nature Communications},
  year={2020},
  volume={11}
}
Dingoes are wild canids living in Australia, originating from domestic dogs. They have lived isolated from both the wild and the domestic ancestor, making them a unique model for studying feralization. Here, we sequence the genomes of 10 dingoes and 2 New Guinea Singing Dogs. Phylogenetic and demographic analyses show that dingoes originate from dogs in southern East Asia, which migrated via Island Southeast Asia to reach Australia around 8300 years ago, and subsequently diverged into a… 
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