Genomic evidence for the Pleistocene and recent population history of Native Americans

@article{Raghavan2015GenomicEF,
  title={Genomic evidence for the Pleistocene and recent population history of Native Americans},
  author={Maanasa Raghavan and Matthias Steinr{\"u}cken and Kelley Harris and Stephan Schiffels and Simon Rasmussen and Michael Degiorgio and Anders Albrechtsen and Cristina E. Valdiosera and Mar{\'i}a C. {\'A}vila-Arcos and Anna-Sapfo Malaspinas and Anders Eriksson and Ida Moltke and Mait Metspalu and Julian R Homburger and Jeff Wall and Omar E. Cornejo and Jos{\'e} V{\'i}ctor Moreno-Mayar and Thorfinn Sand Korneliussen and Tracey L. Pierre and Morten Rasmussen and Paula F. Campos and Peter de Barros Damgaard and Morten E. Allentoft and John Lindo and Ene Metspalu and Ricardo Rodr{\'i}guez-Varela and Josefina Mansilla and Celeste N. Henrickson and Andaine Seguin-Orlando and Helena Malmstr{\"o}m and Thomas W. Stafford and Suyash S. Shringarpure and Andr{\'e}s Moreno-Estrada and Monika Karmin and Kristiina Tambets and Anders Bergstr{\"o}m and Yali Xue and Vera M Warmuth and Andrew D. Friend and Joy S Singarayer and Paul J. Valdes and François Balloux and Il{\'a}n Leboreiro and Jos{\'e} Luis Vera and H{\'e}ctor Rangel-Villalobos and Davide Pettener and Donata Luiselli and Loren G. Davis and Evelyne Heyer and Christoph P. E. Zollikofer and Marcia S. Ponce de Le{\'o}n and Colin Smith and Vaughan Grimes and Kelly A. Pike and Michael Deal and Benjamin T. Fuller and Bernardo Arriaza and Vivien G Standen and Maria F. Luz and François-Xavier Ricaut and Ni{\`e}de Guidon and L. P. Osipova and Mikhail Ivanovich Voevoda and Olga L Posukh and Oleg P. Balanovsky and Maria Lavryashina and Yu. V. Bogunov and Elza K. Khusnutdinova and Marija Gubina and Elena Balanovska and Sardana Fedorova and Sergey Litvinov and Boris Malyarchuk and Miroslava Derenko and M. j. Mosher and David R. Archer and Jerome S. Cybulski and Barbara Petzelt and Joycelynn Mitchell and Rosita Worl and Paul J. Norman and Peter Parham and Brian M. Kemp and Toomas Kivisild and Chris Tyler-Smith and Manjinder S. Sandhu and Michael Crawford and Richard Villems and David George Smith and Michael R. Waters and Ted Goebel and John R Johnson and Ripan Singh Malhi and Mattias Jakobsson and David J. Meltzer and Andrea Manica and Richard Durbin and Carlos D. Bustamante and Yun S. Song and Rasmus Nielsen and Eske Willerslev},
  journal={Science},
  year={2015},
  volume={349}
}
Genetic history of Native Americans Several theories have been put forth as to the origin and timing of when Native American ancestors entered the Americas. To clarify this controversy, Raghavan et al. examined the genomic variation among ancient and modern individuals from Asia and the Americas. There is no evidence for multiple waves of entry or recurrent gene flow with Asians in northern populations. The earliest migrations occurred no earlier than 23,000 years ago from Siberian ancestors… Expand

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