Genomic and archaeological evidence suggest a dual origin of domestic dogs

@article{Frantz2016GenomicAA,
  title={Genomic and archaeological evidence suggest a dual origin of domestic dogs},
  author={Laurent Alain François Frantz and Victoria E. Mullin and Maud Pionnier-Capitan and Oph{\'e}lie Lebrasseur and Morgane Ollivier and Angela R. Perri and Anna Linderholm and Valeria Mattiangeli and Matthew D. Teasdale and Evangelos A. Dimopoulos and Anne Tresset and Marilyne Duffraisse and Finbar McCormick and L{\'a}szl{\'o} Bartosiewicz and Erika G{\'a}l and {\'E}va {\'A}gnes Nyerges and Mikhail V. Sablin and St{\'e}phanie Br{\'e}hard and Marjan Mashkour and Adrian Bǎlǎşescu and Benjamin Gillet and Sandrine Hughes and Olivier Chassaing and Christophe Hitte and Jean-Denis Vigne and Keith M. Dobney and Catherine H{\"a}nni and Daniel G. Bradley and Greger Larson},
  journal={Science},
  year={2016},
  volume={352},
  pages={1228 - 1231}
}
A dogged investigation of domestication The history of how wolves became our pampered pooches of today has remained controversial. Frantz et al. describe high-coverage sequencing of the genome of an Irish dog from the Bronze Age as well as ancient dog mitochondrial DNA sequences. Comparing ancient dogs to a modern worldwide panel of dogs shows an old, deep split between East Asian and Western Eurasian dogs. Thus, dogs were domesticated from two separate wolf populations on either side of the… 
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