Genomic Diversity and Admixture Differs for Stone-Age Scandinavian Foragers and Farmers

@article{Skoglund2014GenomicDA,
  title={Genomic Diversity and Admixture Differs for Stone-Age Scandinavian Foragers and Farmers},
  author={Pontus Skoglund and Helena Malmstr{\"o}m and Ayça Omrak and Maanasa Raghavan and Cristina E. Valdiosera and Torsten G{\"u}nther and Per Hall and Kristiina Tambets and Jüri Parik and Karl-G{\"o}ran Sj{\"o}gren and Jan Apel and Eske Willerslev and Jan Stor{\aa} and Anders G{\"o}therstr{\"o}m and Mattias Jakobsson},
  journal={Science},
  year={2014},
  volume={344},
  pages={747 - 750}
}
Hunters and Farmers The Neolithic period in Europe saw the transition from a hunter-gatherer lifestyle to farming. Previous genetic analyses have suggested that hunter-gatherers were replaced by immigrant farmers. Skoglund et al. (p. 747, published online 24 April) sequenced one Mesolithic and nine Neolithic Swedish individuals to examine the transition from hunter-gatherers to farmers. Substantial genetic differentiation was observed between hunter-gatherers and farmers: There was lower… 
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