Genomic Affinities of Two 7,000-Year-Old Iberian Hunter-Gatherers

@article{SnchezQuinto2012GenomicAO,
  title={Genomic Affinities of Two 7,000-Year-Old Iberian Hunter-Gatherers},
  author={Federico S{\'a}nchez-Quinto and Hannes Schroeder and Oscar Ram{\'i}rez and Mar{\'i}a C. {\'A}vila-Arcos and Marc Pybus and I{\~n}igo Olalde and Amhed Missael Vargas Velazquez and Mar{\'i}a Encina Prada Marcos and Julio Manuel Vidal Encinas and Jaume Bertranpetit and Ludovic Orlando and M. Thomas P. Gilbert and Carles Lalueza-Fox},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2012},
  volume={22},
  pages={1494-1499}
}
The genetic background of the European Mesolithic and the extent of population replacement during the Neolithic is poorly understood, both due to the scarcity of human remains from that period and the inherent methodological difficulties of ancient DNA research. However, advances in sequencing technologies are both increasing data yields and providing supporting evidence for data authenticity, such as nucleotide misincorporation patterns. We use these methods to characterize both the… Expand
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