Genome-wide association study identifies a second prostate cancer susceptibility variant at 8q24

@article{Gudmundsson2007GenomewideAS,
  title={Genome-wide association study identifies a second prostate cancer susceptibility variant at 8q24},
  author={Julius Gudmundsson and Patrick Sulem and Andrei Manolescu and Laufey Thora Amundadottir and Daniel Fannar Gudbjartsson and Agnar Helgason and Thorunn Rafnar and J{\'o}n Th{\'o}r Bergth{\'o}rsson and Bjarni Agnar Agnarsson and Adam Baker and Asgeir Sigurdsson and Kristrun R. Benediktsdottir and Margret Jakobsdottir and Jianfeng Xu and Thorarinn Blondal and Jelena Pop Kostic and Jielin Sun and Shyamali Ghosh and Simon N. Stacey and Magali Mouy and Jona Saemundsdottir and Valgerdur M. Backman and Kristleifur Kristj{\'a}nsson and Alejandro Tres and Alan W. Partin and Marjo T Albers-Akkers and J Marcos and Patrick C. Walsh and Dorine W Swinkels and Sebastian Navarrete and Sarah D. Isaacs and Katja K.H. Aben and Theresa Graif and John P. Cashy and Manuel Ruiz-Echarri and Kathleen E. Wiley and Brian K. Suarez and Johannes Alfred Witjes and Michael L. Frigge and Carole Ober and Eirikur Jonsson and Gudmundur Vikar Einarsson and Jos{\'e} Ignacio Mayordomo and Lambertus A. Kiemeney and William B. Isaacs and William J. Catalona and Rosa B. Barkardottir and Jeffrey R. Gulcher and Unnur Thorsteinsd{\'o}ttir and Augustine Kong and K{\'a}ri Stef{\'a}nsson},
  journal={Nature Genetics},
  year={2007},
  volume={39},
  pages={631-637}
}
Prostate cancer is the most prevalent noncutaneous cancer in males in developed regions, with African American men having among the highest worldwide incidence and mortality rates. Here we report a second genetic variant in the 8q24 region that, in conjunction with another variant we recently discovered, accounts for about 11%–13% of prostate cancer cases in individuals of European descent and 31% of cases in African Americans. We made the current discovery through a genome-wide association… Expand
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