Genome-wide SNP and haplotype analyses reveal a rich history underlying dog domestication

@article{vonHoldt2010GenomewideSA,
  title={Genome-wide SNP and haplotype analyses reveal a rich history underlying dog domestication},
  author={Bridgett M. vonHoldt and John P. Pollinger and Kirk E. Lohmueller and Eunjung Han and Heidi G. Parker and Pascale Quignon and Jeremiah D. Degenhardt and Adam R. Boyko and Dent Earl and Adam Auton and Andy Reynolds and Katarzyna Bryc and Abra G Brisbin and James C. Knowles and Dana S. Mosher and Tyrone C. Spady and Abdel G. Elkahloun and Eli Geffen and Małgorzata Pilot and Włodzimierz Jędrzejewski and Claudia Greco and Ettore Randi and Danika L. Bannasch and Alan N. Wilton and Jeremy R. Shearman and Marco Musiani and Michelle Cargill and Paul G. Jones and Zuwei Qian and Wei Huang and Zhao-Li Ding and Ya-ping Zhang and Carlos D. Bustamante and Elaine A. Ostrander and John Novembre and Robert K. Wayne},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2010},
  volume={464},
  pages={898-902}
}
Advances in genome technology have facilitated a new understanding of the historical and genetic processes crucial to rapid phenotypic evolution under domestication. To understand the process of dog diversification better, we conducted an extensive genome-wide survey of more than 48,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in dogs and their wild progenitor, the grey wolf. Here we show that dog breeds share a higher proportion of multi-locus haplotypes unique to grey wolves from the Middle East… 
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