Genome sequence of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

@article{Gardner2002GenomeSO,
  title={Genome sequence of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum},
  author={Malcolm J. Gardner and Neil Hall and Eula L Fung and Owen White and Matthew Berriman and Richard W. Hyman and Jane M. Carlton and Arnab Pain and Karen E. Nelson and Sharen Bowman and Ian T. Paulsen and Keith D. James and Jonathan A. Eisen and Kim M Rutherford and Steven L. Salzberg and Alister G. Craig and Sue A Kyes and Man-Suen Chan and Vishvanath Nene and Shamira J. Shallom and Bernard B. Suh and Jeremy D. Peterson and Samuel V. Angiuoli and Mihaela Pertea and Jonathan E. Allen and Jeremy D. Selengut and Daniel H. Haft and Michael W. Mather and Akhil B. Vaidya and David M. A. Martin and Alan H. Fairlamb and Martin J. Fraunholz and David S. Roos and Stuart A. Ralph and Geoffrey Ian McFadden and Leda M. Cummings and G. M. Subramanian and Chris J. Mungall and J. Craig Venter and Daniel J. Carucci and Stephen L. Hoffman and Chris I Newbold and Ronald W. Davis and Claire M. Fraser and Bart Barrell},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2002},
  volume={419},
  pages={498-511}
}
The parasite Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for hundreds of millions of cases of malaria, and kills more than one million African children annually. Here we report an analysis of the genome sequence of P. falciparum clone 3D7. The 23-megabase nuclear genome consists of 14 chromosomes, encodes about 5,300 genes, and is the most (A + T)-rich genome sequenced to date. Genes involved in antigenic variation are concentrated in the subtelomeric regions of the chromosomes. Compared to the… 
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Recent Progress in Functional Genomic Research in Plasmodium falciparum
TLDR
Some recent advances and studies in characterizing gene function and related phenotype in P. falciparum that were made possible by the genome sequence are highlighted, particularly the development of a genome-wide diversity map and various high-throughput genotyping methods for genome- wide association studies (GWAS).
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TLDR
The nucleotide sequence of the third largest of the parasite's 14 chromosomes, chromosome 12, which comprises about 10% of the 23-megabase genome, is reported, which is the most (A + T)-rich genome sequenced to date.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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