Genome sequence of an obligate intracellular pathogen of humans: Chlamydia trachomatis.

@article{Stephens1998GenomeSO,
  title={Genome sequence of an obligate intracellular pathogen of humans: Chlamydia trachomatis.},
  author={Richard S. Stephens and Sue Kalman and Claudia J. Lammel and J. Fan and Rekha Marathe and L. Aravind and Wayne Mitchell and Lynn Olinger and Roman L. Tatusov and Q Zhao and Eugene V. Koonin and R W Davis},
  journal={Science},
  year={1998},
  volume={282 5389},
  pages={
          754-9
        }
}
Analysis of the 1,042,519-base pair Chlamydia trachomatis genome revealed unexpected features related to the complex biology of chlamydiae. Although chlamydiae lack many biosynthetic capabilities, they retain functions for performing key steps and interconversions of metabolites obtained from their mammalian host cells. Numerous potential virulence-associated proteins also were characterized. Several eukaryotic chromatin-associated domain proteins were identified, suggesting a eukaryotic-like… 
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