Genome Sequencing Highlights the Dynamic Early History of Dogs

@article{Freedman2014GenomeSH,
  title={Genome Sequencing Highlights the Dynamic Early History of Dogs},
  author={Adam H. Freedman and Ilan Gronau and Rena M. Schweizer and Diego Ortega-Del Vecchyo and Eunjung Han and Pedro Silva and Marco Galaverni and Zhenxin Fan and Peter Marx and Bel{\'e}n Lorente-Galdos and Holly C. Beale and Oscar Ram{\'i}rez and Farhad Hormozdiari and Can Alkan and Carles Vil{\`a} and Kevin Squire and Eli Geffen and Josip Kusak and Adam R. Boyko and Heidi G. Parker and Clarence C Lee and Vasisht R. Tadigotla and Adam C. Siepel and Carlos D. Bustamante and Timothy T. Harkins and Stanley F. Nelson and Elaine A. Ostrander and Tom{\'a}s Marqu{\`e}s-Bonet and Robert K. Wayne and John Novembre},
  journal={PLoS Genetics},
  year={2014},
  volume={10}
}
To identify genetic changes underlying dog domestication and reconstruct their early evolutionary history, we generated high-quality genome sequences from three gray wolves, one from each of the three putative centers of dog domestication, two basal dog lineages (Basenji and Dingo) and a golden jackal as an outgroup. Analysis of these sequences supports a demographic model in which dogs and wolves diverged through a dynamic process involving population bottlenecks in both lineages and post… 

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