Genome Sequence Diversity and Clues to the Evolution of Variola (Smallpox) Virus

@article{Esposito2006GenomeSD,
  title={Genome Sequence Diversity and Clues to the Evolution of Variola (Smallpox) Virus},
  author={Joseph J. Esposito and Scott A. Sammons and A. Michael Frace and John D Osborne and Melissa A. Olsen-Rasmussen and Ming Zhang and Dhwani Govil and Inger K Damon and Richard L Kline and Miriam T. Laker and Yu Li and Geoffrey L. Smith and Hermann Meyer and James W Leduc and Robert M. Wohlhueter},
  journal={Science},
  year={2006},
  volume={313},
  pages={807 - 812}
}
Comparative genomics of 45 epidemiologically varied variola virus isolates from the past 30 years of the smallpox era indicate low sequence diversity, suggesting that there is probably little difference in the isolates' functional gene content. Phylogenetic clustering inferred three clades coincident with their geographical origin and case-fatality rate; the latter implicated putative proteins that mediate viral virulence differences. Analysis of the viral linear DNA genome suggests that its… 
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