Genetics of venous thrombosis

@article{Rosendaal2009GeneticsOV,
  title={Genetics of venous thrombosis},
  author={Frits Richard Rosendaal and Pieter H. Reitsma},
  journal={Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis},
  year={2009},
  volume={7}
}
Summary.  Venous thrombosis (deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism) is a common and serious disorder, with genetic and acquired risk factors. The genetic risk factors can be subdivided in to those that are strong, moderate and weak. Strong risk factors are deficiencies of antithrombin, protein C and protein S. Moderately strong are factor V Leiden, prothrombin 20210A, non‐O blood group and fibrinogen 10034T. There are many weak genetic risk factors, including fibrinogen, factor XIII and… Expand
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