Genetics of the metabolic syndrome

@article{Groop2000GeneticsOT,
  title={Genetics of the metabolic syndrome},
  author={L. Groop},
  journal={British Journal of Nutrition},
  year={2000},
  volume={83},
  pages={S39 - S48}
}
  • L. Groop
  • Published 2000
  • Medicine, Biology
  • British Journal of Nutrition
The clustering of cardiovascular risk factors such as abdominal obesity, hypertension, dyslipidaemia and glucose intolerance in the same persons has been called the metabolic or insulin-resistance syndrome. In 1998 WHO proposed a unifying definition for the syndrome and chose to call it the metabolic syndrome rather than the insulin-resistance syndrome. Although insulin resistance has been considered as a common denominator for the different components of the syndrome, there is still debate as… Expand
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