Genetics of individual differences in bitter taste perception: lessons from the PTC gene

@article{Kim2005GeneticsOI,
  title={Genetics of individual differences in bitter taste perception: lessons from the PTC gene},
  author={Un-Kyung Kim and Dennis Drayna},
  journal={Clinical Genetics},
  year={2005},
  volume={67}
}
The ability or inability to taste the compound phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) is a classic inherited trait in humans and has been the subject of genetic and anthropological studies for over 70 years. This trait has also been shown to correlate with a number of dietary preferences and thus may have important implications for human health. The recent identification of the gene that underlies this phenotype has produced several surprising findings. This gene is a member of the T2R family of bitter… Expand
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