Genetics of Floral Traits Influencing Reproductive Isolation between Aquilegia formosa and Aquilegia pubescens

@article{Hodges2002GeneticsOF,
  title={Genetics of Floral Traits Influencing Reproductive Isolation between Aquilegia formosa and Aquilegia pubescens},
  author={Scott A. Hodges and Justen B. Whittall and Michelle Fulton and Ji Y. Yang},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={2002},
  volume={159},
  pages={S51 - S60}
}
Reproductive isolation between Aquilegia formosa and Aquilegia pubescens is influenced by differences in their flowers through their effects on pollinator visitation and pollen transfer. Here, we investigate the genetic basis of floral characters differentiating these species. We found that in addition to the effects of flower orientation and the length of nectar spurs previously described, other characters such as flower color or odor affect hawkmoth visitation. Repeatability of measurements… Expand
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