• Corpus ID: 44812536

Genetics, behavior and ecology of a paper wasp invasion : Polistes dominulus in North America

@article{Liebert2006GeneticsBA,
  title={Genetics, behavior and ecology of a paper wasp invasion : Polistes dominulus in North America},
  author={Aviva E. Liebert and George J. Gamboa and Nancy E. Stamp and Tracy R. Curtis and Kimberley M. Monnet and Stefano Turillazzi and Philip T B Starks},
  journal={Annales Zoologici Fennici},
  year={2006},
  volume={43},
  pages={595-624}
}
Studies of social insect invasions to date have focused primarily on highly eusocial insects such as ants and yellowjacket wasps. Yet insect societies without fixed, morphological caste systems may be particularly good invaders due to their behavioral flexibility, as demonstrated by the recent invasion of the European paper wasp Polistes dominulus into North America. Here we provide a review of this ongoing invasion in terms of (1) population genetic variation in P. dominulus, and (2… 

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