Genetic variation and population structure in remnant populations of black rhinoceros, Diceros bicornis, in Africa

@article{Harley2005GeneticVA,
  title={Genetic variation and population structure in remnant populations of black rhinoceros, Diceros bicornis, in Africa},
  author={E. H. Harley and Ingrid Baumgarten and Jessica Cunningham and Colleen O'Ryan},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2005},
  volume={14}
}
Black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) are one of the most endangered mammal species in Africa, with a population decline of more than 96% by the end of the last century. Habitat destruction and encroachment has resulted in fragmentation of the remaining populations. To assist in conservation management, baseline information is provided here on relative genetic diversity and population differentiation among the four remaining recognized subspecies. Using microsatellite data from nine loci and 121… Expand
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