Genetic variation across species’ geographical ranges: the central–marginal hypothesis and beyond

@article{Eckert2008GeneticVA,
  title={Genetic variation across species’ geographical ranges: the central–marginal hypothesis and beyond},
  author={C. Eckert and K. Samis and S. Lougheed},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2008},
  volume={17}
}
There is growing interest in quantifying genetic population structure across the geographical ranges of species to understand why species might exhibit stable range limits and to assess the conservation value of peripheral populations. However, many assertions regarding peripheral populations rest on the long‐standing but poorly tested supposition that peripheral populations exhibit low genetic diversity and greater genetic differentiation as a consequence of smaller effective population size… Expand
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