Genetic variability of the μ-opioid receptor influences intrathecal fentanyl analgesia requirements in laboring women

@article{Landau2008GeneticVO,
  title={Genetic variability of the μ-opioid receptor influences intrathecal fentanyl analgesia requirements in laboring women},
  author={Ruth Landau and Christian Kern and Malachy Oliver Columb and Richard M. Smiley and Jacques Blouin},
  journal={PAIN},
  year={2008},
  volume={139},
  pages={5-14}
}
Labor initiates one of the most intensely painful episodes in a woman's life. Opioids are used to provide analgesia with substantial interindividual variability in efficacy. mu-Opioid receptor (muOR, OPRM1) genetic variants may explain differences in response to opioid analgesia. We hypothesized that OPRM1 304A/G polymorphism influences the median effective dose (ED(50)) of intrathecal fentanyl via combined spinal-epidural for labor analgesia. Nulliparous women were prospectively recruited… CONTINUE READING
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