Genetic testing, ethical concerns, and the role of patent law

@article{Caulfield2000GeneticTE,
  title={Genetic testing, ethical concerns, and the role of patent law},
  author={Timothy Caulfield and E Richard Gold},
  journal={Clinical Genetics},
  year={2000},
  volume={57}
}
This article examines the changing debate over gene patenting and the possible connection between patent law and the ethical and policy concerns associated with the use of genetic testing technologies (e.g. the premature implementation and inappropriate marketing of genetic tests). Arguably, patent law helps to form the market forces that lead to these concerns. It is suggested that existing safeguards fail to control these concerns because of, for example, a lack of provider knowledge and an… 
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