Genetic structure, introgression, and a narrow hybrid zone between northern and California spotted owls (Strix occidentalis)

@article{Barrowclough2005GeneticSI,
  title={Genetic structure, introgression, and a narrow hybrid zone between northern and California spotted owls (Strix occidentalis)},
  author={George F. Barrowclough and Jeff G. Groth and Lisa A. Mertz and Ralph J. Guti{\'e}rrez},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2005},
  volume={14}
}
The northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) is a threatened subspecies and the California spotted owl (Strix occidentalis occidentalis) is a subspecies of special concern in the western United States. Concern for their continued viability has arisen because of habitat loss caused by timber harvesting. The taxonomic status of the northern subspecies has been the subject of continuing controversy. We investigated the phylogeographical and population genetic structure of northern and… Expand
Genetic differentiation and inferred dynamics of a hybrid zone between Northern Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis caurina) and California Spotted Owls (S. o. occidentalis) in northern California
TLDR
A NSO population close to the northern edge of the CSO range in northern California (the NSO Contact Zone population) is highly differentiated relative to other NSO populations throughout the remainder of their range, and the Contact Zone is identified as a third distinct population that is differentiated from CSO and NSO found in the remainder the subspecies' range. Expand
GENETIC STRUCTURE OF MEXICAN SPOTTED OWL (STRIX OCCIDENTALIS LUCIDA) POPULATIONS IN A FRAGMENTED LANDSCAPE
TLDR
Analysis of mitochondrial DNA control-region sequences used to investigate the genetic structure of Mexican Spotted Owl populations in the southwestern United States found that intrapopulation genetic diversity was high in all but the southeastern Arizona “sky island” populations, where it was variable. Expand
Introgression and dispersal among spotted owl (Strix occidentalis) subspecies
TLDR
The validity of previously recognized spotted owl subspecies was tested by analysing 394 spotted owls at 10 microsatellite loci and results supported current recognition of three subspecies, and bi‐directional hybridization and dispersal between northern and California spotted Owls was found. Expand
Genomic Variation and Recent Population Histories of Spotted (Strix occidentalis) and Barred (Strix varia) Owls
TLDR
An updated SO genome assembly along with 51 high-coverage whole-genome sequences are used to examine population structure, hybridization, and recent changes in population size in SO and BO and estimate that western and eastern BOs have been genetically separated for thousands of years. Expand
Evidence for recent population bottlenecks in northern spotted owls (Strix occidentalis caurina)
TLDR
Evidence for recent bottlenecks in northern spotted owls is reported using a large genetic dataset and suggests that loss of genetic variation is an emerging threat to the subspecies’ persistence. Expand
Genomic variation and population histories of spotted (Strix occidentalis) and barred (S. varia) owls
TLDR
An improved SO genome assembly is presented, and evidence of substantial genetic differentiation between the two SO subspecies is found, suggesting that Northern SO experienced a moderate population bottleneck around the end of the last glaciation, while BO population sizes have always been large. Expand
The Hybrid Zone between Northern and California Spotted Owls in the Cascade—Sierran Suture Zone
Abstract. Both the geographic center and the shape of the hybrid zone between the Northern Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) and California Spotted Owl (S. o. occidentalis) have been unknownExpand
DISTRIBUTIONAL DYNAMICS OF INVASION AND HYBRIDIZATION BY STRIX SPP. IN WESTERN NORTH AMERICA
Understanding how hybridization may affect extant and emerging taxa requires knowledge of the origins, viability, and breeding tendencies of hybrid individuals. We examined the geographic andExpand
Whole-genome sequences suggest long term declines of spotted owl (Strix occidentalis) (Aves: Strigiformes: Strigidae) populations in California
We analyzed whole-genome data of four spotted owls (Strix occidentalis) to provide a broad-scale assessment of the genome-wide nucleotide diversity across S. occidentalis populations in California.Expand
Contrasting patterns of mitochondrial and microsatellite genetic structure among Western European populations of tawny owls (Strix aluco)
TLDR
It is suggested that congruence among genetic markers should be more likely in cases of range expansion into new areas than when populations interact across contact zones. Expand
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TLDR
The pattern of haplotype coalescence enabled us to identify the approximate timing and direction of a recent episode of gene flow from the Sierra Nevada to the northern coastal ranges, and the California spotted owl had substantially lower nucleotide diversity than the other two subspecies. Expand
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REDEFINING THE DISTRIBUTIONAL BOUNDARIES OF THE NORTHERN AND CALIFORNIA SPOTTED OWLS: IMPLICATIONS FOR CONSERVATION
Abstract The Northern Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) is listed as a threatened species. However, the range description given at the time of listing is inconsistent with the rangeExpand
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TLDR
The small number of F1 hybrids detected during many years of extensive banding studies of Spotted Owls suggests that the isolating mechanisms that separate Barred and Spotted owls are normally sufficient to avoid hybridization between them. Expand
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TLDR
A model of dispersal and territory occupancy that assumes demographic equilibrium is evaluated using data on the amount of old forest habitat remaining in the Pacific Northwest and the current occupancy of this habitat by northern spotted owls, implying that extinction will result if the old forest is reduced to less than a proportion of the total area in a large region. Expand
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About 130 taxa of birds reach distributional limits in the central Great Plains, and 28 of these are replaced there by closely related taxa that are apparently their ecological counterparts. In manyExpand
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TLDR
The first records of hybridization between the Northern Spotted Owl and Northern Barred Owl are presented, two species that are thought to be closely related and that have recently become sympatric. Expand
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