Genetic monogamy in the common loon (Gavia immer)

@article{Piper1997GeneticMI,
  title={Genetic monogamy in the common loon (Gavia immer)},
  author={Walter Piper and D. C. Evers and Michael W. Meyer and Keren B. Tischler and Joseph D. Kaplan and Robert C. Fleischer},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={1997},
  volume={41},
  pages={25-31}
}
Abstract We conducted behavioral observations and genetic analysis on breeding pairs of common loons in the upper Great Lakes region from 1993 through 1995 to look for behavioral evidence of extrapair copulations (EPCs) and to determine parentage of young. Pairs remained close to each other (usually within 20 m) during the pre-laying period, leaving little opportunity for EPCs to occur. Males and females both maintained physical proximity by approaching each other when they became separated… Expand

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