Genetic monogamy in Monteiro's hornbill, Tockus monteiri

@article{Stanback2002GeneticMI,
  title={Genetic monogamy in Monteiro's hornbill, Tockus monteiri
},
  author={Mark Stanback and David S. Richardson and Christian Boix-Hinzen and John M. Mendelsohn},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2002},
  volume={63},
  pages={787-793}
}
Abstract Hornbills display a unique breeding habit in which the female seals herself into the nest cavity prior to egg laying and remains ensconced for most of the breeding cycle. This habit necessitates long-term sperm storage, which considerably lengthens the fertile period of the female. This in turn increases the amount of time available to females to engage in extrapair copulations. Because food delivered by the male is the primary source of energy for female maintenance, egg production… Expand

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