Genetic heterogeneity and penetrance analysis of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in breast cancer families. The Breast Cancer Linkage Consortium.

@article{Ford1998GeneticHA,
  title={Genetic heterogeneity and penetrance analysis of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in breast cancer families. The Breast Cancer Linkage Consortium.},
  author={Deborah Ford and Douglas F. Easton and Michael R. Stratton and Steven A. Narod and David E. Goldgar and Peter Devilee and D. Timothy Bishop and B L Weber and Gilbert M. Lenoir and Jenny Chang-Claude and Hagay Sobol and Marion Dawn Teare and Jeffery P. Struewing and Adalgeir Arason and Siegfried Scherneck and Julian Peto and Timothy R. Rebbeck and Patricia N. Tonin and Susan L. Neuhausen and Rosa B. Barkardottir and Jorunn Erla Eyfjord and H T Lynch and Bruce A. J. Ponder and S. A. Gayther and M Zelada-Hedman},
  journal={American journal of human genetics},
  year={1998},
  volume={62 3},
  pages={
          676-89
        }
}
The contribution of BRCA1 and BRCA2 to inherited breast cancer was assessed by linkage and mutation analysis in 237 families, each with at least four cases of breast cancer, collected by the Breast Cancer Linkage Consortium. Families were included without regard to the occurrence of ovarian or other cancers. Overall, disease was linked to BRCA1 in an estimated 52% of families, to BRCA2 in 32% of families, and to neither gene in 16% (95% confidence interval [CI] 6%-28%), suggesting other… 

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