Genetic evidence of an early exit of Homo sapiens sapiens from Africa through eastern Africa

@article{QuintanaMurci1999GeneticEO,
  title={Genetic evidence of an early exit of Homo sapiens sapiens from Africa through eastern Africa},
  author={Llu{\'i}s Quintana-Murci and Ornella Semino and Hans-J{\"u}rgen Bandelt and Giuseppe Passarino and Ken McElreavey and A. Silvana Santachiara‐Benerecetti},
  journal={Nature Genetics},
  year={1999},
  volume={23},
  pages={437-441}
}
The out-of-Africa scenario has hitherto provided little evidence for the precise route by which modern humans left Africa. Two major routes of dispersal have been hypothesized: one through North Africa into the Levant, documented by fossil remains, and one through Ethiopia along South Asia, for which little, if any, evidence exists. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can be used to trace maternal ancestry. The geographic distribution and variation of mtDNAs can be highly informative in defining… Expand

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